Tyler Keevil's Writing Space

The virtual equivalent of Deep Cove, as viewed from Quarry Rock

Tyler Keevil is a novelist, screenwriter, and short story writer from Vancouver, Canada.  He is the author of three award-winning books: Fireball, The Drive, and Burrard Inlet.

Short Fiction Publications 2010-11

This contribution to BGR 2011 was something of a change-up for Keevil. His comic story, 'Liberty! Fraternity! Sexuality!' is about the star of a university football team (American-style) who has something of an identity crisis when he starts taking Creative Writing classes.  The piece satirizes both the cutthroat nature of writing workshops, and the macho world of sporting culture - but underneath all that it's a love story.  As the editor Richard Labonte pointed out, it's 'a gay romance only obliquely' but in that respect offered a unique take on the theme.

       February, 2011

       February, 2011

Up-and-coming author Holly Howitt teamed up with Jan Fortune-Wood, longtime editor of Cinnamon Press, to assemble this collection of postcard stories from a wide range of writers.  Tyler's contribution, 'Gary Gets a Giraffe,' is a humorous look at middle-class anxiety.  The narrator becomes increasingly worried and suspicious when his wife decides to purchase an extraordinary present for his best friend's birthday: a real live giraffe. 

       November, 2010

       November, 2010

In this film-themed issue Staple magazine, editor Wayne Burrows brought together writings by screenwriters Michael Eaton and Georgina Lock, stories that allude to cinematic images – like the gun-toting women of Tyler Keevil’s ‘Antigone’s Mantle’ who bring a dash of Godard’s 1968 to present day Dyfed, Shirley Golden’s dying teenager taking refuge in thoughts of Philip K Dick’s androids in ‘Do Humans Dream of Electric Hearts’, or Jill Campbell’s new mother conjuring ambiguously benign help from ‘The Doula.’


       Summer 2010

       Summer 2010

For issue 58 of the American slipstream magazine Leading Edge, Tyler contributed a piece of urban fantasy, 'Redemption Songs,' set in his native Vancouver, in the Commercial Drive and Hastings Street area.  There are dashes of Miyazaki and the work of Ted Chiang in this tale that envisions an alternate realm where spirits are powerful and corporeal entities, like forces of nature, whose influence can leak over into the everyday world - with devastating results.

          Spring, 2010

          Spring, 2010

Tyler's first contribution to Interzone was a grim and gritty piece of speculative literature called 'Hibakusha.' The title is a Japanese word that literally translates to 'explosion-affected people' - a term coined for survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki nuclear bombings.  In an imagined future where Britain has suffered a similar atrocity, the term has taken on new meaning. The narrator is part of a salvage crew that enters ground zero to help clear and clean the detritus from the bombsite: the British Museum.  The story was singled out for praise in reviews from Tangent and SFRevu.

      January, 2010

      January, 2010

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